Population Genetics in Drosophila

Population Genetics in Drosophila

I'm a postdoc at the University of Stirling, focusing on the long-term impacts of ionising radiation upon populations of Drosophila melanogaster. My expertise lie in ecotoxicology and population genetics, including the use of RADseq for investigating population mapping, identifying candidate regions of the genome associated with adaptive traits and for genome assembly.

Previously, I was an OCE postdoctoral fellow at CSIRO, investigating the adaptive capacity of the global pest, Helicoverpa armigera, and its impact upon the Americas following a recent invasion into Brazil. In order to better understand the genes associated with resistance, the gene flow between global populations, as well as the evolutionary history of the species complex, I made use of high-throughput sequencing and analytical techniques. I continue to contribute to this work through my role as a CSIRO affiliate. 

During my PhD, I was shared between CEH and Cardiff University, working to elucidate the effects of arsenic upon susceptible populations of the earthworm, Lumbricus rubellus. I incorporated a number of end points at different levels of biological complexity, ranging from life-history modelling to metabolomics, transcriptomic and chemical profiling in exposed individuals to provide a foundation for which to recognise resistance in natural populations.